What is ALS?

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as "Lou Gehrig's Disease," is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.

ALS stands for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, which is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. ALS is often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, named after the famous baseball player Lou Gehrig who was diagnosed with the condition in the 1930s.

In ALS, motor neurons, which are responsible for controlling voluntary muscles, gradually degenerate and die. This leads to the loss of muscle control and ultimately results in paralysis. The cause of ALS is not fully understood, and there is currently no cure for the disease. Treatment focuses on managing symptoms and improving the quality of life for individuals with ALS.

The symptoms of ALS can vary, but they generally include muscle weakness, difficulty speaking, swallowing difficulties, and problems with coordination. The progression of the disease varies from person to person.

5,000+

people are diagnosed per year

2-5 Years

is the average life expectancy

Only 10%

of cases are inherited through a mutated gene

According to the American Academy of Neurology's Practice Parameter Update, studies have shown that participation in a multidisciplinary ALS clinic may prolong survival and improve quality of life.